This mourning locket and chain are an excellent match, but are actually two separate pieces.

The fittings only compliment the hairwork of the chain itself and do not become the prominent focal point. The tight hairwave ensures that there’s a sturdiness to the chain and the weave is comfortable for the wearer.

Necklaces like this are common throughout most of the 19th century, though as discussed in the past, there is a large variation can be found in the style of the hair weave and occasionally the gold fittings. Pieces like this can be dated quite well through looking in original catalogues of the time, pieces like this were quite common from the 1870s.

Further Reading
> A History of Hairwork (Series)
> Bending Your Brain with a Victorian Hairwork Fob Chain
> Hello ‘Mother’! A Hinged Hairwork Band
> One Family in a 19th Century Hairwork Bracelet

Necklaces of course weren’t relegated to hair, and the pieces that weren’t display a union between the chain itself and the pendant it is attached to.

This ‘regard’ necklace and pendant from Barbara Robbins is an exquisite example of its form. From the hairwork under glass to the organic design of the gold work. Though clearly of its time, the organic design is shows an almost nouveau prototype in its nature patterns, right down to the gold hearts with flower designs that contain the stones. Much of this has to do with the transient art styles of the mid 19th century. The Neo-Rococo Romantic period is in full bloom with this piece, from the floral decorations of the gold to the basic sentiment of the stones.

The chain and heart design are a perfect union in this piece, delicate and never over balanced in their weight. It should also be noted that on the back of each heart where the stones sit are glass panels with hair inside. There is more than one type of hair on display in this piece, with the table-worked feathered hair on milk glass showing at least two colours and then the magnificent hair behind each of the regard mementoes.

Further Reading

> The Late 19th Century and Buckle Rings

> An 1876 Hair Ring

> A Late 19th Century Hairwork Ring

> 1888 Sentimental Hair Band in Original Heart-Shaped Box

> An Early Hair Ring: 1860 ‘My David’

> 3 Members of a Family Mourning Ring with Diamond and Blue Enamel

This mourning locket and chain are an excellent match, but are actually two separate pieces.

The fittings only compliment the hairwork of the chain itself and do not become the prominent focal point. The tight hairwave ensures that there’s a sturdiness to the chain and the weave is comfortable for the wearer.

Necklaces like this are common throughout most of the 19th century, though as discussed in the past, there is a large variation can be found in the style of the hair weave and occasionally the gold fittings. Pieces like this can be dated quite well through looking in original catalogues of the time, pieces like this were quite common from the 1870s.

Necklaces of course weren’t relegated to hair, and the pieces that weren’t display a union between the chain itself and the pendant it is attached to.

This ‘regard’ necklace and pendant from Barbara Robbins is an exquisite example of its form. From the hairwork under glass to the organic design of the gold work. Though clearly of its time, the organic design is shows an almost nouveau prototype in its nature patterns, right down to the gold hearts with flower designs that contain the stones. Much of this has to do with the transient art styles of the mid 19th century. The Neo-Rococo Romantic period is in full bloom with this piece, from the floral decorations of the gold to the basic sentiment of the stones.

The chain and heart design are a perfect union in this piece, delicate and never over balanced in their weight. It should also be noted that on the back of each heart where the stones sit are glass panels with hair inside. There is more than one type of hair on display in this piece, with the table-worked feathered hair on milk glass showing at least two colours and then the magnificent hair behind each of the regard mementoes.

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